CHAPTER 6 • NEUROHUMORAL CONTROL OF THE HEART AND CIRCULATION
147
This, along with aortic arch denervation,
would
enhance
the
pressor
response
of
norepinephrine.
CASE 6-1
Bilateral renal artery stenosis reduces the
pressure
within
the
afferent
arterioles,
which causes release of renin. This, in turn,
increases circulating angiotensin II, which
stimulates
aldosterone
release.
Activation
of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system
causes sodium and fluid retention by the
kidneys and an increase in blood volume,
which increases cardiac output. Increased
vasopressin (stimulated by angiotensin II)
contributes to the increase in blood volume.
Increased angiotensin II increases systemic
vascular resistance by binding to vascular
AT: receptors and by enhancement of sympa-
thetic activity. These changes in cardiac out-
put and system ic vascular resistance lead to a
hypertensive state.
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Rhoades RA, Bell, DR. Medical Physiology: Principles
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